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SxBRC

 

 

 

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Welcome to the Sussex Biodiversity Record Centre

Coronavirus: How SxBRC is responding
As of 17th March, SxBRC staff are working from home for the foreseeable future. We are putting systems in place to enable SxBRC to continue functioning as near normally as possible. However, there might be some disruption to our services - so please bear with us while we all get used to these new ways of working.
If you need to contact SxBRC, please send us an email. You can find all our email addresses on the team page. Our telephone system is not currently set up to work remotely, so we would ask that you don't phone.

NBN

Click here to access the NBN web page that collates published guidance from a number of organisations in respect of biological recording and survey work during COVID‑19 restrictions.

Species records: 7,677,730

July species of the month: Pantaloon Bee, Dasypoda hirtipes

Pantaloon Bee, <i>Dasypoda hirtipes</i>

Who can resist the Pantaloon Bee (Dasypoda hirtipes)? With its extraordinary, beautifully coloured hind legs, it is a strikingly handsome insect. It also shouldn’t be hard to miss.

More »

Upcoming recording events:

No events in the calendar for the week ahead.

Events Calendar »

Welcome to the website of the Sussex Biodiversity Record Centre, one of the many local environmental record centres situated around the UK. We provide environmental information services encompassing biodiversity, geodiversity and other aspects of Sussex’s natural capital. We cover the two counties of East and West Sussex, including Brighton & Hove, in South East England. We are a small but dedicated team of environmental data managers, naturalists and IT specialists.

The Sussex Biodiversity Record Centre is managed as a partnership project, hosted by the Sussex Wildlife Trust. Our partners include local planning authorities, government agencies, conservation bodies and other organisations which need access to up-to-date biodiversity information, such as water companies.

Sussex has a vibrant and energetic biological recording community with many independent recording groups and societies. By strengthening relationships with these groups, and the wider network of naturalists, ecologists and recording schemes active in Sussex, the Record Centre facilitates sharing of ever-greater amounts of biodiversity data.

Upcoming recording events:

No events in the calendar for the week ahead.

Events Calendar »

Species records: 7,677,730

July species of the month: Pantaloon Bee, Dasypoda hirtipes

Pantaloon Bee, <i>Dasypoda hirtipes</i>

Who can resist the Pantaloon Bee (Dasypoda hirtipes)? With its extraordinary, beautifully coloured hind legs, it is a strikingly handsome insect. It also shouldn’t be hard to miss.

More »

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Latest news

The White-legged Damselfly Investigation

3 July 2020

White-legged Damselfly female

Female White-legged-Damselfly
Photo: Simon Linington

White-legged Damselfly Male

Male White-legged-Damselfly
Photo: Simon Linington

White-Legged Map

Distribution of White-legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes records in Sussex
Source: SxBRC

White-legged Damselfly female

Female White-legged-Damselfly
Photo: Simon Linington

White-legged Damselfly Male

Male White-legged-Damselfly
Photo: Simon Linington

White-Legged Map

Distribution of White-legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes records in Sussex
Source: SxBRC

The British Dragonfly Society is asking for your sightings of White-legged Damselfly to help inform trends due to concerns of this species declining in the UK.

White-legged Damselflies are mainly found along slow-flowing lowland rivers and streams, and occasionally on canals or ponds. As the name suggests, they have obviously pale legs, males are a pale blue with black markings and females are cream with black markings. There is more information on how to identify them from similar blue damselflies on the British Dragonfly Society website (or there’s this pdf: https://british-dragonflies.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/WLDI-ID-guide-2020-1.pdf)

The Dragonflies of Sussex (2004) noted that it is “predominantly found across the High and Low Weald, where it can be locally abundant, and well distributed along sections of the upper Arun and mid-Sussex Adur. There is an isolated presence at Chichester gravel pits.” Since then, there have been records from significantly more squares covering both the High and Low Weald and, notably, the far east of Sussex. This may well relate to consolidation and expansion of range but could possibly be explained by improved observer coverage.

If you see one, please submit records to iRecord with a photo if possible, or email it to bobforeman@sussexwt.org.uk

 

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